Thursday, December 25, 2008

What is the difference between CD-R and CD-RW?

I thought that we had already done a tip on this subject, but after doing some research for it, I couldn't find anything. We have one for DVDs, which is pretty similar, but I thought I would go ahead and answer the CD part of it for you. Good thing you asked!

Both the CD-R and CD-RW CDs look alike, but there are obviously some major differences between them. (They wouldn't have separate names if there wasn't, right?!) We've done several articles on burning lately, so you should be pretty up to par on that, but picking the CDs you are going to use is the next big step. The main difference that comes into play is the quality you will get from each type of CD.

Most people burn CDs to either back up their data or to make a music CD. The CD-R format is a more inexpensive disk with a decent amount of quality. They usually hold between 650 and 700 MB of information. These are good for saving any type of information, but they're better used for school projects, copying games, moving data from one computer to another, etc. If you're not planning on ever erasing the information, you'll want to use a CD-R.

On the other hand, a CD-RW is a rewriteable disk. They are more flexible for the mere fact that you can write and rewrite information on them. You can usually copy over them at least 40 times as well, which is pretty impressive. CD-RWs are good for making music CDs, because if you get tired of that music, you can always copy new songs over the old data. So, if you're planning on erasing the information you put on a CD, use a CD-RW, because you can get a lot more use out of them. This also makes it less expensive in the end, because of the reuse factor.

Whichever format you use, you burn them the same way. As long as you have a CD burner and some type of burning software installed on your computer, you're good to go. As I said earlier, this information is pretty much the same for DVDs, but here's an article you can read on that if you're wanting to burn DVDs instead.

Happy burning!
~ Erin

Sunday, December 21, 2008

Monitors: LCD vs. CRT

There’s a fierce battle raging in the world of computer monitors these days! It’s basically old technology pitched against a constantly evolving new technology and there's no telling who will eventually triumph over the other. It will more than likely be LCD, but for now, let's take a look at the following factors before favoring one over the other. Here we go!

Size Does Matter

There’s something to be said about Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) monitors. To begin, the size is a lot less than what is usually given. For example, if it’s a 32" monitor, it actually means 32" diagonally. However, a 17" CRT monitor will only have a 15.7" viewable diagonal image. This is where LCD monitors score, because they are measured by the actual size of the screen.

Look at the Applications

If you're really into gaming or your job is to create high-end graphic designs and animations, a larger, more advanced CRT screen is still the best bet for you. But, if you're a home user who isn’t so particular about size or application, an LCD screen would do just fine. The image quality on an LCD is excellent, the look is more contemporary and it doesn’t strain your eyes that much either. Now, if your preference is a CRT monitor, don’t buy anything smaller than a 17” monitor. Similarly, if you're going for a 15" LCD monitor, you might as well go for a 17,” because they cost pretty much the same. If your house is spacious enough, you should go for the biggest LCD monitor you can afford.

The Price Stakes

There were days when there was quite a price difference between LCD and CRT monitors. But with much of today's technology streamlined and quality controls in place, it’s increasingly becoming a business with high volumes. And the best part? The prices are going southward as the days fly by. According to the price stakes, a 19" LCD monitor can be purchased for an affordable $200. However, for LCD sizes larger than 21," the price shoots up by 50 to 100 percent. If a 21" LCD can be had for around $250, the larger sizes cost upwards of $400.

Bundled Monitors

If you're going for a branded PC, the monitors (whether LCD or CRT) come with it. However, those monitors may not score high on quality and performance. So, it’s best to choose the right brand that is good at all of these things. The way out of this is to go for an "assembled PC," where you go to a vendor and choose the brand of PC, UPS, DVD ROM, hard drive, monitor and so on. The best way to find the best monitor for yourself is to check out the entire range of monitors and go for one that suits your needs the most.

Don’t Mistake Them for Flat Screens

You can get a flat screen CRT monitor, as well as, an LCD. So, just because the vendor is promising to hand you a cheaper flat screen monitor, don’t think it’s an LCD and jump for the deal. You should always ask the vendor if it's a CRT or an LCD. That's the only way to know for sure.

Happy monitor shopping, my friends!

~ Zahid H. Javali courtesy worldstart

Tuesday, December 9, 2008

USB Storage device.

USB storage devices are relatively cheap these days, as such in order to avoid my kids from messing up my PC hard drives, i had instructed that my kids, including those from Primary School to get their own USB storage devices. They are required to a get a RM20.00 USB storage device each using their own Hari Raya Puasa money, immediately after the first day of Raya. I did this, in order to provide a psychological reason, that will make them take a better care of their own USB storage devices and educating them, to spend their money wisely rather than on some silly "mini fireworks" which is a norm for the kids here. They are free to use their own USB storage device for keeping whatever they want, downloads - songs, you-tubes, movies, games and for their school work such as for contents of their folios.

And I have regularly reminded them on how to remove their USB storage device, safely. I found out that somebody had written those reminders so I am sharing it with you.

Proper Removal

Are you one of the many who use a flash drive these days? I mean, really, how can you resist? They are so simple to use and just as convenient as can be. So, tell me, when you go to remove your flash drive from the USB port it's in, how do you do it? Do you just yank it out of there and go on with your day? If you do, that's not really the proper way to do it and if you keep doing it that way, you could end up ruining your flash drive. Well, lucky for you, I have come bearing instructions on how to properly remove a flash drive from your computer.

There are actually a couple different ways you can do this. I suggest that you read through them and choose the one that you feel the most comfortable with. The first one has a few less steps than the second, so we'll start there. When you're ready to take your flash drive out, double click on the My Computer icon on your desktop and find the drive that your flash drive is listed under. (It will usually be listed under a "Removable Disk" letter). Right click on that drive and choose Eject. You can then remove the flash drive with no risks of ruining anything.

The second way is to use your Safely Remove Hardware icon, located in your bottom system tray. Double click on that icon (it's a little green arrow with a little gray disk underneath it). Highlight the choice that says "USB Mass Storage Device" and click on the Stop button. Next, find the entry for your flash drive and click on it so it's highlighted. Click OK. You will then see a little pop up window in the bottom of your screen telling you that it's now safe to remove the hardware. Once you see that, you can remove the flash drive and go on your way. As you can see, both ways are very easy to do, but you need to make sure you do at least one of them, in order to keep your flash drive safe!

~ Erin ( Courtesy )

There is no limit to creativity (courtesy - st.bull my egroup)

Phillips Electronics in collaboration with Swarovski made the 'Active Crystal' collection of USB memory. These are really fancy.

This is platinum USB drive hand set with 350
white diamonds. It even comes with a solid
platinum chain and you can have it for $38,000.

Here are some less expencive.



There are memory sticks shaped like food...

ice cream

or drink.



teddy bear...


Disney caracters...

Human thumb

Friday, December 5, 2008